BENEFITS OF VITAMIN E

Here’s a rundown on some of its interesting benefits:
A great antioxidant:  The most important discovery with respect to vitamin E is its antioxidant property.  Antioxidants are very much the superstars when it comes to protecting us from illnesses.  These compounds fight and destroy the “free radicals” that can damage our cells and lead to chronic degenerative illness like Alzheimer’s, cancers, heart illness and diabetes.  Free radicals are released as part of the routine digestive processes, pollution, smoking, junk food consumption and so on.   The best-known benefit of vitamin E is that it can quench these free radicals before they can do any harm.
And this same quality of this vitamin may also help slow down the ageing process, as per some studies.
Liver protection:  A recent study by European Association for the Study of the Liver has found that about 38 % of those treated with vitamin E supplements were cured of a nasty ailment called “NASH” or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, a condition in which liver cells become inflamed and damaged because of excessive fat accumulation. Central obesity and sedentary lifestyle have seen a sharp rise in NASH which is not related to alcohol consumption in any way but yet is as dangerous.  The study found that vitamin E was as helpful as other medications in treating NASH.
Eye health:  One of the leading causes of blindness, especially in the elderly, is a condition called macular degeneration, an illness that affects the vision. Clinical trials conducted in the US found that Vitamin E, along with some other crucial vitamins reduced the risk of this degenerative illness.
Muscle building:  Fitness enthusiast need to sit up and take note of an interesting recent research which points out that without Vitamin E, the muscle cells do not repair themselves after the damage that occurs during heavy weight lifting. Although more research is still needed in this area, having adequate stores of this vitamin seems to help optimise muscle mass.
Brain health:  Vitamin E may help prevent the age-related cognitive decline as per recent studies.  Research has also thrown some light on a possible link between adequate vitamin E intake and reduced risk of brain tumours.
Heart health:  There are different types of fats and polyunsaturated fatty acids Viz. (PUFA), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and saturated fats have all made headlines especially in relation to health in one form or the other.  Among these, PUFA are the types of fats which have a type of linkage in their composition that makes them susceptible to being disturbed by free radicals.  Excessive intake of a type of PUFA, called omega 6 fatty acid, is known to increase the risk of developing heart disease in the long term. Vitamin E, due to its antioxidant properties can negate the harmful effects of omega 6 fats, thereby preventing hardening of arteries and controlling inflammation that usually cause blocks in the arteries of the heart.
Vitamin E intake can also correct and prevent irregular heart rhythms that could be one of the major symptoms of vitamin E deficiency that is set off either due to prolonged poor intake or in certain chronic illnesses that result in poor absorption of this nutrient.
Cancer:  The omega 6 fatty acids are also implicated in tumour growth mainly due to their pro-inflammatory effects, which means that they promote inflammation in our body cells.  Vitamin E counteracts this inflammatory effect of omega 6 fats and helps reduce the risk of cancer.
Sources of Vitamin E
As with everything else, natural known sources of nutrients are always safer and are recommended over concentrated supplements that can harm in the long run.  Both the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) and the American Heart Association recommend getting this nutrient from a well-balanced diet comprising of a good combination of foods from all food groups such as vegetables, nuts, oil, fruits and whole grain cereals.
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommend a daily intake of 15 mg of vitamin E per day for adults from natural foods. When we talk about foods rich in vitamin E, wheat germ and wheat germ oil grab the headlines.  One tablespoon of any one of these sources can meet the daily requirements.  Wheat germ is the healthy part of the wheat grain that sprouts and grows into the plant.  Most nutrients are found in this part along with Vitamin E.  However, the germ is removed while processing wheat to make flour or other processed products.  Fresh milled whole wheat flour is a good source of vitamin E.  Wheat germ is also now available and adding a tablespoon in the daily breakfast may be a great way of getting the required dose of vitamin E.
Since Vitamin E is a fat-soluble nutrient, some amount of fat is required along with vitamin E rich foods to help your digestive system absorb the vitamin effectively.  Add a dash of healthy oils such as olive, canola, rice bran, groundnut or mustard oil while making a delicious vitamin E rich dish!
Spinach: One of the most easily available greens, spinach offers about 20 % of the daily requirements of vitamin E in one cup of cooked spinach.
Almonds: These tasty nuts turn out to be a good source of vitamin E since it combines both healthy fats and vitamin E in a great combination. Vitamin E, being fat soluble, is best absorbed in presence of fats as already discussed. About 10 numbers of almonds provide close to 50 % of the daily needs of the nutrient.
Fish: Some fish, especially salmon and swordfish are a fair source of Vitamin E, giving about 8 to 10 % of the daily dose in 100 grams portion of fish.

Diets for Diabetes

If you’re living with type 2 diabetes and looking for a sensible weight-loss plan, one of these choices may just fit.

According to government figures, more than 85 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese (although excess weight isn’t the only risk factor for this type of diabetes). But for people with type 2 diabetes who fall into that 85 percent, dropping the pounds can help stabilize blood sugar levels and even eliminate the need for diabetes medication.

So which diet can help you achieve your weight-loss goals? There’s no one right answer. But, says Nora Saul, RD, CDE, a certified diabetes educator and manager of nutritional education at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, ÔÇ£people who have diabetes can, with a little forethought, use many of the healthy popular diets.ÔÇØ

Weight-Loss Plans for Type 2 Diabetes

If you have type 2 diabetes and want to lose weight, here are some sensible diet options to try.

DASH Diet: ÔÇ£Although originally designed to lower blood pressure, DASH ÔÇö or Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension ÔÇö is an all-around good eating plan,ÔÇØ says Saul. In fact, U.S. News and World Report rated the DASH diet as tops for treating diabetes in a May 2011 article. That’s because the diet is high in fruits and vegetables, which means it’s high in fiber, antioxidants, and potassium. ItÔÇÖs also high in low-fat dairy, calcium, lean protein, and whole grains. ÔÇ£It has meal plans for different calorie levels,ÔÇØ says Saul, which allows flexibility according to your weight.

South Beach Diet: The South Beach Diet is a modified low-carb diet that emphasizes healthy fats. If you want to try it, Saul advises sticking to the maintenance phase of the diet. ÔÇ£The initial phases are too low in carbohydrates,ÔÇØ Saul points out. Yes, people with diabetes have to watch how many carbs and the type of carbs they eat, but you donÔÇÖt want to cut them out entirely. ÔÇ£I encourage whole grains,ÔÇØ says Saul, who warns against eliminating any specific food group, even for weight loss. (Note: Everyday Health is the publisher of SouthBeachDiet.com.)

Weight Watchers: Weight Watchers is a popular commercial weight-loss plan. ItÔÇÖs also a good choice if you have type 2 diabetes, in part because the system provides group support and accountability in addition to a structured eating plan. People with diabetes might need to make some modifications to the diet plan, however. For example, explains Saul, in the latest version of Weight Watchers counting system or “points,” fruit has zero points. But for people with diabetes, a serving size of fruit does count toward total carb intake for the day.

Mediterranean Diet: Though not a specific eating plan, a Mediterranean diet mimics the way that people who live in countries around the Mediterranean Sea, such as Greece and Italy, tend to eat. Rich in beans, nuts, fruits, vegetables, grains, and seafood, it isnÔÇÖt so much a weight-loss diet as a different way of eating. ÔÇ£People lose weight because they are full and are not eating a lot of the empty calories they consumed before,ÔÇØ says Saul, who says this concept works well for people with diabetes, too.

Atkins Diet: The Atkins Diet gained fame as the diet that led the low-carb diet revolution twice. This diet may be a good option for some people and can help manage blood sugar levels, but it can be too restrictive and may not be a long-term lifestyle choice for everyone with diabetes. However, reading about and trying out this diet could be a learning experience in terms of understanding how carbs function in your diet.

Jenny Craig: Jenny Craig (now rebranded as Jenny) is a personalized eating and diet program that includes a lot of support as well as prepackaged meals. The catch is that it can be costly and, although the diet plan is intended to ultimately help you make your own meals and food choices, some people might find it difficult to get out of the habit of relying on a stocked freezer. Finally, people with diabetes that is not adequately controlled may be discouraged from enrolling.

GI Diet: A low glycemic index (GI) diet is an excellent choice for people with type 2 diabetes, Saul says. This one might require some research and study until you understand exactly where foods fit in the glycemic index and how you can include the right ones in your diet. The glycemic index lets you know how fast a 50-gram portion of a carbohydrate food raises blood sugar in comparison with white bread. The lower the number, the better the food is for controlling blood sugar.

Whatever diet you decide on, there are a few overarching principles that should guide your choice. Among them, look for diets that include food you like (or will come to like) and that donÔÇÖt rely on expensive supplements or tools. And be sure to check with your doctor before beginning any weight-loss regimen.

Ref : everydayhealth

Diabetes Myths and Truths

Despite the tremendous amount of medical information now available to the public, many inaccurate ideas still persist about the nature and treatment of diabetes. Read on to separate fact from fiction.

The Myth: Eating too much sugar causes diabetes.

The Truth: Years ago, folks called it “sugar diabetes,” implying that the disease was caused by eating too much of the sweet stuff. Medical experts now know that diabetes is triggered by a combination of genetic and lifestyle factors. However, being overweight ÔÇö which can result from indulging in high-calorie sugary foods ÔÇö does increase your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. If you have a history of diabetes in your family, eating a healthy meal plan and getting regular exercise are recommended to manage your weight.

The Myth: People with diabetes can’t eat any sweets or chocolate.

The Truth: If part of a healthy meal plan, or combined with exercise, sweets and desserts can be eaten by people with diabetes. They are no more “off limits” to people with diabetes than they are to people without diabetes.

The Myth: People with diabetes can only eat special diabetic foods.

The Truth: A healthy meal plan for people with diabetes is the same as that for everyone: low in fat (especially the saturated and trans fats found in butter, lard, full-fat dairy products and meats, and solid vegetable oils), moderate in salt and sugar, with meals based on whole-grain foods, vegetables and fruit. Diabetic and “dietetic” versions of sugar-containing foods offer no special benefit. They still raise blood glucose levels, are usually more expensive and can also have a laxative effect if they contain sugar alcohols.

The Myth: All diabetics have to take insulin injections.

The Truth: Injected insulin is usually only necessary for those with Type 1 diabetes, in which the body no longer produces it own insulin. Those with Type 2 generally have plenty of insulin, but their bodies don’t respond well to it. Some people with type 2 diabetes, particularly if blood-glucose levels are poorly controlled, do need diabetes pills or insulin shots to help their bodies use glucose for energy. However, most type 2 cases can be helped without medication, by losing weight, adopting a healthier diet, increasing exercise and other lifestyle changes. (By the way, insulin cannot be taken as a pill, as the hormone would be broken down during digestion just like the protein in food. Insulin must be injected into the fat under the skin for it to get into your blood.)

The Myth: If you have diabetes, you have to stay away from starchy foods like bread, potatoes and pasta.

The Truth: Whole-grain breads, cereals and pasta, brown rice and starchy vegetables such as potatoes, yams, peas and corn are part of a healthy meal plan and can be included in your meals and snacks. These foods, high in complex carbohydrates, are also a good source of fiber, which helps keep your gastrointestinal system running smoothly. The key is portion size. Most people with diabetes should limit themselves to three or four servings of complex carbohydrates a day.

The Myth: Type 2 Diabetes only affects blood-sugar levels, decreasing your energy.

The Truth: Type 2 diabetes affects many different systems and organs of the body, including the cardiovascular system, leading to stroke or heart disease; the eyes, which can result in conditions from dry eye to retinal disease (retinopathy); the nerves, causing severe damage (neuropathy) that can necessitate lower-limb amputation; the kidneys, which fail and require dialysis; and the skin, which can become prone to infections. Experts predict that, over the next 30 years, there will be 35 million heart attacks, 13 million strokes, 8 million new cases of blindness, 6 million kidney failures, 2 millions amputations and 62 million deaths ÔÇö all linked to diabetes. Learn more about many serious complications and how to cope with them.

The Myth: Only adults can develop Type 2 Diabetes.

The Truth: Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in school-aged children. About 1 in every 400 to 600 children has type 1 diabetes, which was used to be called “juvenile diabetes,” which is caused by disruption of the pancreas’ ability to produce insulin. However, in recent years more and more children and teens have become overweight (10 to 15 percent, about double the number of two decades ago), and so increasing numbers of young people are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. According to several studies, since 1994, cases have increased from less than 5 percent to between 30 and 50 percent. Two million of those age 12 to 19 (or 1 in 6 overweight adolescents) have pre-diabetes.

Ref: everydayhealth

Should we eliminate SUGAR from our diet?

Sugar seems to have developed a reputation as the big bad wolf in relation to health. Medical News Today have reported on numerous studies associating sugar intake with increased aging, cardiovascular disease, obesity and even cancer. Such research has led to many health experts around the globe calling for reductions in recommended sugar intake, with some saying we should cut out sugar completely. But is it really that bad for our health? We investigate.

Put simply, sugar is a crystallinecarbohydrate that makes foods taste sweet. There are many different types of sugar, including glucose, fructose, lactose, maltose and sucrose – also known as table sugar.

Some of these sugars, such as glucose, fructose and lactose, occur naturally in fruits, vegetables and other foods. But many of the foods we consume contain “added” sugars – sugar that we add to a product ourselves to enhance the flavor or sugar that has been added to a product by a manufacturer.

The most common sources of added sugars include soft drinks, cakes, pies, chocolate, fruit drinks and desserts. Just a single can of cola can contain up to 7 tsps of added sugar, while an average-sized chocolate bar can contain up to 6 tsps.

It is added sugars that have been cited as a contributor to many health problems. In December 2014, MNT reported on a study in the journal Open Heart claiming added sugars may increase the risk of high blood pressure, even more so than sodium. And in February 2014, a study led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) associated high added sugar intake with increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Perhaps most strongly, added sugars have been associated with the significant increase in obesity. In the US, more than a third of adults are obese, while the rate of childhood obesity has more than doubled in children and quadrupled in adolescents over the past 30 years.

A 2013 study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggested that consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages increases weight gain in both children and adults, while a review paper from the World Health Organization (WHO) notes an increase in the consumption of such beverages correlates with the increase in obesity.

Are we becoming addicted to sugar?

In support of these associations is Dr. Robert Lustig, a pediatric endocrinologist at the University of California-San Francisco and author of the book Fat Chance: The Hidden Truth About Sugar, who claims sugar is a “toxic” substance that we are becoming addicted to.

“The food industry has made it into a diet staple because they know when they do you buy more,” he added. “This is their hook. If some unscrupulous cereal manufacturer went out and laced your breakfast cereal with morphine to get you to buy more, what would you think of that? They do it with sugar instead.”

In her popular blog, Goop, Gwyneth Paltrow cites sugaraddiction as one of the reasons she decided to quit sugar completely.

“The bottom line is that sugar works the addiction and reward pathways in the brain in much the same way as many illegal drugs,” she writes. “Sugar is basically a socially acceptable, legal, recreational drug with deadly consequences.”

Statistics show that we are certainly a nation of added-sugar lovers. According to a report from the CDC, adults in the US consumed around 13% of their total daily calorie intake from added sugars between 2005-2010, while 16% of children’s and adolescents’ total calorie intake came from added sugars between 2005-2008.

These levels are well above those currently recommended by WHO, which state we should consume no more than 10% of total daily calories from “free” sugars – both naturally occurring sugars and those that are added to products by the manufacturer.

In 2013, however, MNT reported on a study by Prof. Wayne Potts and colleagues from the University of Utah, claiming that even consuming added sugars at recommended levels may be harmful to health, after finding that such levels reduced lifespan in mice.

Is eliminating sugar from our diet healthy?

The array of studies reporting the negative implications of added sugar led to WHO making a proposal to revise their added sugar recommendations in 2014. The organization issued a draft guideline stating they would like to halve their recommended daily free sugar intake from 10% to 5%.

“The objective of this guideline is to provide recommendations on the consumption of free sugars to reduce the risk of noncommunicable diseases in adults and children,” WHO explained, “with a particular focus on the prevention and control of weight gain and dental caries.”

In addition, it seems many health experts, nutritionists and even celebrities like Gwyneth have jumped on a “no sugar” bandwagon. But is it even possible to completely eliminate sugar from a diet? And is it safe?

Many people turn to artificial sweeteners as a sugar alternative, but according to a study reported by MNT in 2014, these sweeteners may still drive diabetes and obesity.

The study, published in the journal Nature, suggests artificial sweeteners – including saccharin, sucralose and aspartame – interfere with gut bacteria, increasing the activity of pathways associated with obesity and diabetes.

What is more, they found long-term consumption of artificial sweeteners was associated with increased weight, abdominal obesity, higher fasting blood glucose levels and increased glycosylated hemoglobin levels.

“Together with other major shifts that occurred in human nutrition, this increase in artificial sweetener consumption coincides with the dramatic increase in the obesity and diabetes epidemics,” the authors note. “Our findings suggest that artificial sweeteners may have directly contributed to enhancing the exact epidemic that they themselves were intended to fight.”

Ref : Medicalnewstoday

Enjoy the Summer. Precautions to be taken for Summer

Summer is here and the temperatures are roaring, all of us need to take precautions to prevent general conditions. These conditions may feel normal and nothing out of course, but it may worsen if not taken care of.

Below are listed few preventive measures for the most commonly occurring ailments:

STROKE:

Everyone is well versed with this phenomenon. The temperature of the body rises due to excessive exposure to heat. But we usually ignore the signs and symptoms. This summer, make sure to follow simple rules when you step outdoor.

ÔÇô Wear clothes which allow good ventilation make sure the fabric of the clothes is light.

ÔÇô┬á There are certain medications and other conditions like sleep deprivation, sun stroke history, etc. which may predispose sun stroke. It is wise to take all the factors into consideration.

ÔÇô Always wear sunscreen and drink plenty of fluid. Always carry a drink together.

SUN BURN:

Sunburns are caused when the skin is exposed to ultraviolet radiations. This increases the risk of skin cancers, which makes it very important to practice precaution.

ÔÇô Sunscreens help protect skin. Re apply sunscreen every 3-4 hours when working outdoors. Make sure you apply sunscreen to all the exposed skin.

ÔÇô It is advised to cover the face with light clothing. Wearing hats and sunglasses provide full protection to the face and the eyes.

DEHYDRATION:

Dehydration applies to a condition when the body is deprived of fluids. Excessive loss of water from the body along with metabolic disruption is not met with enough intake of fluid. The causes of dehydration can be many, but the condition is aggravated during summers, due to high temperatures. Preventive measures include:

-Intake of enough water whenever outdoors or exercising. It ensures that the body is provided with as much fluids as it losses during activities.

-It is very important to carry bottle with water or any other energy drink to replenish the lost fluids.

Avoid outdoors at the pitch hour of the day. If the work can be wait till later, no better option than that!

EPISTAXIS DUE TO SUN:

General term for epitaxis is nose bleeding. Many people suffer from nose bleeds during summers. This is a result of extreme heat. Most of the patients have history of epistaxis during summers. The precautions should be:

-To avoid putting any kind of pressure on the nose.

-It is advisable to cover face when outdoors; it prevents direct contact with high temperatures outdoors.

Above all, consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables during summers will help the body maintain healthy tissue and fight back any bodily disruptions effectively.

These simple, yet very crucial preventing measures will make the summers more enjoyable for everyone.

 

Ref : careinfo.in

Dangers of self-medication

Popping pills without a doctor’s prescription, even if the ailment is minor, could have serious repercussions, warns medical expert, Lalitha Suppiah

We often pop pills for common ailments like fever, colds, cough and headache, without bothering to consult a doctor . Self-medication, even for minor ailments, could lead to medical complications. A large number of potent drugs such as pain relievers, cough remedies, anti-allergies , laxatives, antibiotics, antacids and vitamins are sold over-the-counter (OTC). Selfmedication with OTC medicines could cause allergy, habituation, and addiction. For example, excessive use of vitamins can cause hypervitaminosis , or vitamin poisoning. Antimicrobial resistance is a worldwide problem, particularly in India where antibiotics are often available without a prescription. The dangers of self-medication could include the following:

Misdiagnosing the illness:

A minor health issue which could be resolved easily with the doctor’s advice may become a major problem over time. Symptoms may subside temporarily with self-medication , but it would become difficult for a doctor to correctly diagnose and treat later.

Habituation:

You could become addicted to prescription drugs such as antacids, cough syrups and pain relievers.

Allergic reactions:

Some antibiotics such as penicillin or sulpha drugs can cause severe reactions in the body for some people. These could be fatal.

Insufficient dosage:

Incorrect dosage of medicines will not cure and will prolong recovery. On the other hand, over-dosage may damage liver , kidneys and other organs. Indiscriminate use of antibiotics : These could, over a long time, lead to antimicrobial resistance . Consequently, the antibiotic may become ineffective when taken in the future.

Risk of stroke:

The most commonly misused medicines are painkillers. Analgesics can induce gastritis and can also increase risk of stroke by four times in patients with high BP.

 

Drug interactions:

 

Some herbal drugs and medicines may cause drug-to-drug interactions and adversely affect the body.

 

Self-medication by pregnant women:

This could adversely affect the unborn child causing congenital anomalies and birth defects. Unlike other facets of selfcare , self-medication involves the intake of drugs, which have the potential to be beneficial or harmful . Their improper use can have serious health implications, especially among children, the aged, and in people with special physiological conditions such as pregnancy and lactation. The government and health authorities must ensure that only safe drugs are made available OTC. Consumers should be given adequate information about their u

10 good food habits

Always eat breakfast

Studies show that individuals who eat a substantialbreakfast lose more weight than those who have a small breakfast. Choose eggs or baked beans on wholegrain bread, or muesli with fruit and yoghurt.

Eat your fruit and vegAim for three cups of vegetables and two fruits each day. Fill half your plate with vegies at lunch and dinner, and add fruit to your breakfast and for a snack on the way home from work.

Take time to shop each week

If the food is not in the house, how can you eat well? Schedule in time to shop each week or shop online.

Walk for 10,000 steps or exercise for an hour each day

A pedometer is extremely useful in providing feedback on how many steps you are racking up each and every day.

Sit down at the table to eat

Not only do you eat more slowly and often less food, but you’ll enjoy the social experience of dining.

Always carry a protein-rich snack with you

This way you’ll avoid eating high-fat food on the run. Great options to keep handy include nut- or protein-based snack bars, hard fruit such as an apple or a few wholegrain rice.

Have a green tea after meals

Green tea is high in antioxidants and can help increase metabolic rate.

Always carry a water bottle

Drink at least two bottles of water a day instead of juice, cordial or soft drinks.

Choose wholegrain, low-GI bread and breakfast cereal

Aim for the best-quality breads, crackers and breakfast cereals, as these are foods we eat every day.

Always eat carbohydrates and proteins together

Try eggs on grain toast, yogurt and fruit, crackers and cheese and wholegrain bread with tuna or chicken.

Ref : Body & Soul

Best and worst foods for a good night’s sleep

After a long day, a sound sleep is something that you wish for as soon as you hit the bed. But do you experience days when sleep simply evades you? Before you blame factors that are not in your control, you must know that the last morsel that you put in your mouth before bedtime plays a pivotal role in deciding what kind of sleep you will get. Experts believe that there are some foods that harm your sleep, others that are sleep promoters. So let’s find out about these sleep inducers and sleep stealers.

Sleep inducer: Milk

Do you remember how your grandmother insisted on you having a warm glass of milk before hitting the bed? Well, so you know milk consists amino acid tryptophan, which is a precursor to serotonin, a brain chemical.

Sleep stealer: Wine

You must have read ample studies indicating how red wine is good for your heart. That doesn’t hold true for your sleep. There are studies that prove it leads to low quality of sleep. So you know when not to have wine!

Sleep stealer: Dark chocolate/Coffee

Dark chocolate is healthy and a favourite among chocolate lovers who don’t want to feel guilty after feasting on it. Mind you, don’t feast on it before bedtime. A bar of chocolate contains the same amount of caffeine as decaffeinated coffee. And coffee is a big no no before bedtime.

Sleep inducer: Banana

Try having a banana when you are feeling stressed! Yes, not only does the potassium in the banana relives your stress but the magnesium is also muscle relaxing. On top of that, the carbohydrates present in the banana will help you with a sound sleep.

Sleep stealer: Chicken/paneer curry

Nothing like a filling dinner of chicken curry or paneer makhani but these curries are also responsible for snatching your sleep. One must always avoid a calorie-laden dish before hitting the bed as it will induce trouble in falling asleep and might even be responsible for keeping you away from deep sleep.

Sleep inducer: Vegetable soup

Perfect for this weather, a warm bowl of vegetable soup is your best bet for a happy night sleep. “The softened vegetables in the soup are easy to digest, thus saving your digestive system from the stress of working overtime,” shares diet expert Mansi Chatrath.

Sleep stealer: Green tea

Surprised? After all who doesn’t know green tea is a must have for a healthy life. As a matter of fact, green tea is best when taken during the day. Do not forget that green is not decaffeinated, exactly the element that snatches you sleep.

Sleep inducer: Whole wheat cereal

Try switching to your favourite breakfast cereal as a dinner option and you will know why it is called a sleep inducer. Added to milk, this is the perfect dish to put you to sleep.

Last but not the least, have your food atleast an hour or two before bedtime so that when you hit the bed, your system is not working on digesting your last meal.

Ref:  The Economic Times

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